Welcome To Speech and Language Services

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Signs of Speech Difficulty

  • Signs that indicate a student may have a speech disorder include

    • The student is hard to understand
    • The student appears to have multiple sound errors
    • The student deletes sounds or add sounds at the beginning or ending of words
    • The student has a “slushy” sound to their speech
    • The student omits one sound in a consonant blend such as saying “pay for play”
    • The student repeats words or phrases multiple times or seems to get “stuck” on a word
    • The student’s voice seems breathy, hoarse, or nasal and the student may talk too loud or too soft

     

    Remember, these are general guidelines. Please contact the speech-language pathologist if you have further questions or concerns.

About Me

Ms. Georgie Goldsmith

Phone: 901-685-0976

Email:

Degrees and Certifications:

Master of Arts in Communication Disorders Certificate of Clinical Competence

Ms. Georgie Goldsmith

Ms. Georgie Goldsmith, M.A., CCC-SLP is a part of Woodland’s faculty and is available to talk to you about any concerns you have regarding your child’s communication. Ms. Goldsmith works with Woodland’s teachers and parents to ensure continuity of care and support. Ms. Goldsmith is at school each week on Wednesday and Thursday and can be reached at ggoldsmith@woodlandschool.org. 

 

Signs of Language Difficulty

  • Signs that indicate a student may have a language disorder include

    • The student seems to have difficulty understanding the parents, peers and teachers
    • The student has difficulty understanding new ideas and concepts presented by the teacher or parent
    • The student may have difficulty answering and asking wh- questions
    • The student may use shorter utterances than peers
    • The student may have difficulty talking about events that happened in the past or that will happen in the future
    • The student may have difficulty relating to adults and peers due to not establishing eye contact and not being able to read others’ expressions, voices and body language
    • The student may have difficulty following directions
    • The student may have difficulty retelling a story or event
    • The student may have difficulty with prepositions and pronouns after correction has been given
    • The student excessively repeats what he or she has heard 

    Remember, these are general guidelines. Please contact the speech-language pathologist if you have further questions or concerns.

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